Increasing men’s awareness of the effects of family violence Report commended

Family violence can not only have serious if not fatal consequences for women but the effect on their children can be devastating and long-lasting.
— Commissioner for Children, Mark Morrissey said.

Mr Morrissey was speaking at the launch of the Family Violence Men’s Education Project 2016 report, Increasing Men’s Awareness of the Effects on Children Exposed to Family and Domestic Violence, in Hobart today.

Mr Morrissey said the report makes a very important contribution to the discussion about how to increase men’s awareness of the effects of family violence on their children and lessen the harm it can cause.

“We know that growing up with violence in the home can have devastating and lasting effects on children with consequences for their health and wellbeing, their performance at school, their future relationships and their capacity to be fully participating members of our community,” Mr Morrissey said.

“We are only now beginning to understand how children affected by family violence cope, how they are affected, what contributes to their resilience and what they need.”

“It is a tragic fact that even in a country as advantaged as Australia, many children are not safe or free from violence in their own homes.”

Mr Morrissey said as Commissioner for Children, one of his key functions is to increase awareness of matters relating to the wellbeing of Tasmanian children and young people.

He said wellbeing encompasses care, development, education, health and safety and every child has the right to live in a safe, caring and nurturing environment; free from all forms of violence and abuse.

Mr Morrissey said research data deficiencies however mean that it is difficult to fully understand the extent of the impact of domestic and family violence on children.

He said for children, as for women, living with family violence is not just about experiencing separate incidents of violence - it is also about growing up in an atmosphere of fear and tension. Understandably this can impact enormously on children’s development and wellbeing.

Women and children are disproportionately affected by violence in the home – and that it is attitudes to masculinity and gender inequality which underlie this violent behaviour.

Children learn by what they see their parents doing. We must take decisive action to eliminate attitudes and beliefs which have been used to justify the use of violence by some men in intimate relationships.

“What we do know is that that greatest positive impact on this pervasive problem will come from prevention and early intervention. This must include true and genuine gender equality, and an understanding by all that violence and abuse in its many forms is never a solution.”

“We are all responsible for ensuring that addressing violence against women and children continues to be a top priority for our community and is treated as such by us all in our personal and professional lives.”

 
Mark-Morrissey-Kate-Warner-governnor-and-Katreena-Scott-e1461647986316-md.jpg

The Commissioner for Children, Mark Morrissey, (left), Her Excellency, Professor the Honourable Kate Warner AM, the Governor of Tasmania and Professor Katreena Scott of the Caring Dads Program (Canada).

 

The Salvation Army and UTAS released the report into Increasing Men’s Awareness of the Effects on Children Exposed to Family and Domestic Violence. Guest speakers at the report launch included Mark Morrissey, Commissioner for Children, Her Excellency, Professor the Honourable Kate Warner AM, the Governor of Tasmania, Tino Carnevale, ABC Gardening Australia presenter, Assoc Professor Katreena Scott of the Caring Dads Program (Canada) and Dr Peter Lucas of the research team. 

Speech for Launch of the FV Mens Education Project Final Report April 2016

Jean-Paul MoutonComment